About Business Architecture in Some Companies

About Business Architecture in Some Companies

It is an instrument to create the necessary transparency with regard to professional design objects and their relationships with each other and to accompany a subject-related further development also from the point of view of business / IT alignment. At the same time, the transparency created supports other initiatives within Dos to identify potential synergies and to prove their strategy-oriented orientation. It takes into account that the creation of the business architecture is a living and iterative process, and thus the models and processes relevant to the business architecture are changing. This dynamic is addressed by the minimally invasive approach presented here, which focuses on selected stakeholders and the reuse or expansion of existing architectural documents.

An approach to building and using the business architecture at Dos must, on the one hand, deal with the construction of a corresponding meta-model for mapping the relevant functional design objects. On the other hand, the definition of a suitable procedural model for the introduction, anchoring and continuous management of the business architecture within the organization is necessary. Fundamental to the meta-model and the procedural model are design principles to be defined, which should be guiding by their normative character for the effective organization of the enterprise. In all three points, emphasis is placed on ensuring that their processing does not entail any profound transformation within the organization, in the sense of a minimally invasive approach. Minimally invasive means that the concept of business architecture can be established without organizational restructuring and task changes. This ensures that the concept is compatible with existing architecture management processes. In addition, existing architectural results and documents should be used in building the business architecture. Also important is that the approach to building the business architecture is iterative in nature to accommodate future changes in the business model or new requirements of the most relevant stakeholders.

 

Applied to the business architecture, a minimally invasive approach thus promotes its dissemination and adoption within the organization. Experience and further approaches can be found u. a. in the topic of Organizational Awareness [MZ07]. As a central element, the design principles embody guiding principles according to which the design of the business architecture is geared towards the models assigned to it and their management processes. Within Dos, these general design principles are defined and form the framework for the presented approach. Figure 1 shows the three key elements for the design of the business architecture at Dos.

 

The business architecture meta-model of Dos distinguishes between different levels of abstraction and individual thematic views of the business architecture. This is done out of the need to provide each claim group of the architecture with those views that illustrate their concerns [IE00; LA05]. Following the minimally invasive approach, this also ensures that changes in the model do not always result in modified representations for all other stakeholders. Thus, the business architecture of Dos u. a. The following meta-model views are worked out: – strategy view. The strategy view shows how the company is strategically managed. For this, business imperatives are portrayed as the drivers behind the concrete characteristics of a business strategy. The business strategy provides clues as to which business capabilities should be developed. Their development then takes the form of strategic initiatives. – Business Process View. The aim of the view is to create a common understanding of the stakeholders on the relationships between business processes and business capabilities, organizational structure and process organization. In addition, the significance of company key figures becomes clear. The view is u. a. to improve templates for process descriptions, to derive checklists for descriptions of processes, activities and roles or to define key figures. – Domain view. The domain view is the basis for creating the domain and application map of Dos. The domain view illustrates the transition between business and IS landscape. The view shows how IT-supported business functions and information landscape entities are grouped. The grouping criterion corresponds to the business capability model of the Group